Sometimes you just take the hit

On July 18, 1970, San Francisco Giants second baseman Ron Hunt was hit by a fourth inning pitch thrown by Montreal Expo’s Mike Wegener for a MLB record 119th time.

The Giants claimed a 10-1 home victory over the Expos.

By the end of his career, Hunt was hit by 243 pitches. He is currently sixth in the category, following Jason Kendall (254), Don Baylor (267), Tommy Tucker (272), Craig Baggio (285) and Hughie Jennings (287). Hunt was hit by modern day single season record 51 pitches in 1971, only following Jennings who was hit by 51 in 1896.

Hunt made two All-Star appearances (1964 and 66) and was second in 1963 Rookie of the Year voting.

Even though Hunt was not the player with the most home runs or RBIs, he is a talented player who was able to play on the national stage.

Hunt has also become a open book on the changes the game has undergone. He approached every at bat with the goal of getting on base and if it meant getting hit by a pitch he saw it as taking one for the team. As he watched players defacing the game he dedicated his life (and body) to, the former major leaguer started a self-funded, non-profit baseball school. He was disgusted by the steroid era and despises the players who converse with the ‘enemy’ while on the field.

College athletics have also been on his radar. “We taught them that grades are important, because you only play baseball for part of your life, but you use your head for all of your life,” Hunt says. “And we did not tolerate any bullshit. If you didn’t hustle, you were benched. If you didn’t show up on time, you were benched. No excuses.”

Click here to find out more about Hunt’s views on the atmospheric changes in the game. 

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