Lucky 7 for Schumacher in F1

On October 24, 2004, German Formula 1 racer, Michael Schumacher crossed the finish line fifth in the Brazilian Grand Prix but managed to accumulate 148 points for the season, claiming his fifth consecutive championship.

Schumacher crashed his Ferrari in practice before the day before the season’s final race, damaging his car. Since the engine had to be replaced, he was penalized and started eighth in the final race of the season.

Brazilian racer, Rubens Barrichello finished second with 114 points and United Kingdom’s Jenson Button was third with 85.

In 2005, new technical rules dis-allowed tire changes during races. Michelin was successful in inventing tires suitable for the new demands while Schumacher’s source, Bridgestone struggled. The rules were changed back for the 2006 season but a new rival, Fernando Alonso came in the way of his success. He retired from driving at the season’s conclusion. Schumacher remained active in the F1 world by becoming an advisor for Ferrari and later Mercedes.

In December 2013, Schumacher was skiing in the French Alps and while crossing an unsecured area he fell. If he were not wearing a helmet, he probably would have died.  Tramatic brain damage led doctors to put the former racing legend in a medically induced coma until April the following year. In November 2014 he was reported to be paralyzed and having memory problems and was unable to speak. Recent updates quote former bosses of Schumacher saying there is still “hope” for a recovery.

Schumacher still holds the record for seven career Formula 1 titles.

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